Coagulants are used for treatment of all kinds of water
Coagulation is the oldest known water treatment method
In industry, coagulants are frequently used for water treatment
In drinking water production, coagulants remove particles, humic substances and colour
Coagulants produce healthy and enjoyable drinking water
Coagulants are used for treatment of all kinds of water

Raw water from groundwater, lakes, reservoirs, rivers and streams is rarely fit for human consumption without purification. In order to protect our health, all drinking water must be cleared of pathogens and impurities before it is used.

Coagulation with aluminium or iron salts is the most common technique to remove particles, colour, and impurities. The result is colourless, odourless water which is both palatable and enjoyable.

During the coagulation process, the impurities in the water aggregate in flocs which can easily be separated from the water. The choice of coagulant depends on the raw water quality and the separation method that is used.

Applications

Waste Water
To ensure the water does no harm to people or the environment when it is released, waste water must be treated to reduce the level of contaminants to acceptable levels.
Paper Industry
Inorganic coagulants are used in two critical parts of the paper production process: sizing and retention.
Drinking Water
In order to protect our health, all drinking water must be cleared of pathogens and impurities before it is used.
Industrial Uses
For industry, coagulants provide a method of reusing water in a cost-effective way that does not comprise the industrial process.
Other Applications
In addition to their role as inorganic coagulants, aluminium and iron salts are used in many other applications.

FAQs

What is the carbon footprint of inorganic coagulants?

Inorganic coagulants are soluble salts which are used to purify drinking water and waste water from municipalities and industry. The term ‘inorganic’ simply indicates that the coagulants are not derived from living matter. Typically aluminium and iron salts are used to make coagulants.

These materials are abundant in the Earth’s crust and can also be derived from the recycling processes of industries such as steelmaking.

Conducted by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) on behalf of INCOPA, the LCA study found that the cradle-to-gate emissions of all coagulants studied averaged 0.106 kg CO2-eq/mole Fe3+ or Al3+. The value is extremely low.

Inorganic coagulants provide a cost-effect, environmentally friendly method of water purification.

 

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