Coagulants are used for treatment of all kinds of water
Coagulation is the oldest known water treatment method
In industry, coagulants are frequently used for water treatment
In drinking water production, coagulants remove particles, humic substances and colour
Coagulants produce healthy and enjoyable drinking water
Coagulants are used for treatment of all kinds of water

INCOPA is the European Inorganic Coagulants Producers Association

Inorganic coagulants are aluminium and iron salts; elements essential for water treatment, paper manufacturing, cement industry and fertiliser production. They are naturally occurring and afford safe drinking water to billions the world over.

INCOPA’s members manufacture inorganic coagulants (aluminium and iron salts) which are used to purify drinking water, treat wastewater, and create vital products such as cement, fertilisers and paper.

 

Applications

Waste Water
To ensure the water does no harm to people or the environment when it is released, waste water must be treated to reduce the level of contaminants to acceptable levels.
Other Applications
In addition to their role as inorganic coagulants, aluminium and iron salts are used in many other applications.
Drinking Water
In order to protect our health, all drinking water must be cleared of pathogens and impurities before it is used.
Industrial Uses
For industry, coagulants provide a method of reusing water in a cost-effective way that does not comprise the industrial process.
Paper Industry
Inorganic coagulants are used in two critical parts of the paper production process: sizing and retention.

FAQs

How do inorganic coagulants work?

Coagulants have a positive electrical charge. By contrast, particles which are dissolved or suspended in water typically have a negative charge. The positive charge of the inorganic coagulant neutralises the negative charge of the particle and the two bind together (coagulate) in larger particles in a process known as flocculation.

These larger particles (known as floc) are heavy and quickly settle to the bottom of the water in a process called sedimentation. Lighter flocs can be removed from the water using filters. Different coagulants target different types of particles in the water.

 

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